The Manchurian Candidates for Australia

Australia’s least popular sociopathic narcissist (no, not you Eddie McGuire, sit down), Kevin Rudd, is back in the pages of the declining parish newsletter again, lecturing us on his favourite subject, himself China.

Before we get into the real subject of today’s blog post, perhaps we ought to point out that there is barely a sentence or paragraph in the article without “me”, “my” or “I” (he speaks Mandarin? Wow, that’s the first time we’ve heard that!).

Can anyone offer a suggestion as to why that might be?

Anyway, irrelevant-Rudd’s plea is that Australia doesn’t jaw jaw (to borrow Churchill’s phrase) but have a secret government strategy that is robust in the way the country intends to deal with China.

Here’s a question for Kevin. Given you’ve been out of office for nearly a decade (let’s not count the ridiculous 3 month “comeback tour”), how do you know there isn’t?

He goes on to suggest Australia should not be racist to China which, an unkind critic might suggest, sounds remarkably similar to the immediate post-kidnapping interviews with Patty Hearst.

He’s not the only ex-PM worried that Australia might upset the big northern neighbours, Paul Keating has recently been vocal on the subject too.

He said that Australia’s government and political system had failed in developing a China policy and that the “subtleties of foreign policy and the elasticity of diplomacy are being supplanted by the phobias of a group of security agencies”.

“Phobias”.

Real phobias are about “extreme or irrational fears”.

Given that there are multiple examples of Australian politics being influenced or subject to attempts to influence in recent years (Sam Dastyari, IT hack of parliament, possible defecting spy, possible attempt to install a puppet MP), at what point does a fear cease being irrational?

Bill’s Opinion

Anyone who believes Beijing’s approach to Australia will be ameliorated in any way for the better hasn’t been paying attention.

It is clear to anyone who wishes to look that China has increased the scale and intensity of domestic human rights abuses against groups such as the Uyghurs and Falun Gong. Depending on which reports one believes there are currently perhaps up to a million people internally-exiled in “re-education camps”.

What did the initial reporting of The Holocaust look like? Subdued.

Perhaps one can pass this off and look the other way because “it’s an internal matter”. So was Apartheid… until it wasn’t.

Then there’s the asymmetric trade deals where we get cheap shit and they steal our IP. Is that a great deal?

How about the opioid crisis in the USA? Remember, like surfing, blue jeans, rock and roll and HIV, what the Americans have, Australians get about five years later.

What is the dog that isn’t barking in all of this?

In all of the media coverage of the increasingly bad news relating to China and Australia’s relationship with the country the incredible economic leverage China has over Australia is never mentioned.

Seriously, it’s just not, is it?

Within about 3 to 6 months and without a shot being fired, China could put Australia into a deep recession which would perhaps take years to recover from.

When was the last time you heard the sentiment in the paragraph above ever expressed in the media?

Yet that’s the inference behind every claim for “calm rational heads” when dealing with China.

Perhaps appeasement is Australia’s only option, but there’s still some respect to be had by admitting to it.

The alternative is doubly-cowardly.

3 Replies to “The Manchurian Candidates for Australia”

  1. The opioid crisis in the North Atlantic is Maduro pumping out as much product as he can while he’s still got a job in order to swell his bank balance. There might be a small element of retaliation in it too. AFAIK Australia hasn’t been active on the Maduro front and the small size of the market might make a drug invasion not worthwhile.

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